Fly Fishing Video – 1 Piece Of Advice

If you could offer 1 piece of fly fishing advice what would it be?

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Fly Fishing Video – Answering Questions – Misconceptions!

What are the 3 most common misconceptions surrounding fly fishing?

 

 

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Fly Fishing Midge Imitations On Rivers

A hatching midge pupa hanging just below the surface film.

A hatching midge pupa hanging just below the surface film.

Midges are a huge part of the trout diet simply because they are present in nearly all rivers and lakes throughout the year. Moreover they are the only aquatic fly that will hatch pretty much every day of the year.

midge life cycle

Midges are frequently used in in still water fly fishing, in the UK we often refer to the midge pupa fly as a buzzer. In rivers however, they are used less frequently but they can be deadly when fished in the right way.

Water type

Midge larave, pupa and adult are small. They tend to range in size just a few millimeters up to 2cm in length. Therefore trout will only get a benefit from eating them where they can easily sip them without expending lots of energy. This generally means that midges are best fished in stiller pools where the fish can hold station and sip midges without expending lots of energy as they would in a strong current.

Fish behaviour

After you have found a stiller pool or glide we need to observe fish rising to midges. First be sure that there are midges hatching by observing the surface of the water and checking you can see them, then observe the behaviour of the fish. Often the rise will take the form of a head and tail rise where you see the fishes back and then tail breaking the surface. You may also see just a small sip and the fish takes and emerging midge pupa. If both these conditions are met then you are in luck!

Presentation

A fine tippet is required to present a small midge. I would recommend something around 6x. Also a long tapered leader as you will be fishing in still pools where you are more likely to spook the fish. Cast upstream of the fish making sure your fly line does not go over the rising fish. If you loose eye contact with the fly strike at any rise in the vicinity of your fly. When fishing buzzers, grease up the end of your fly line and use greased hi viz braided loop, if the line stops, slows or moves then strike!

Flies

Dries, emergers and pupa will work brilliantly. Here are my favourites:

river buzzer

River Buzzer >>

black midge klinkhammer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Midge Klink >>

griffiths gnat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Griffiths Gnat >>

midge black size 20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Midge Black Size 20 >>

Match The Hatch! - our weekly hatch report will help.

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Klink & Dink Fly

A video about our popular Klink & Dink fly. Great for fly fishing New Zealand style.

Match The Hatch! - our weekly hatch report will help.

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Barbless Flies – Using Wild River Barbless Nymphs

I have been out on some local urban streams with the Go-Pro. These wild river barbless nymphs are doing so well with the wild brown trout. Check out our selection of barbless flies here >> http://shop.peaksflyfishing.com/barbless-wild-river-flies-409-c.asp

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Posted in barbless flies, Fly fishing techniques, Fly fishing tips, fly fishing video, River fly fishing Tagged with: , ,

Stubborn Early Season Trout

brown trout

STUBBORN EARLY SEASON TROUT

We are in a transition period at the minute, increased daylight and a slight rise in water temperature always stirs a few fish but it’s mainly the anglers that are stirred up for the first few weeks of the season.

At this time of year, I will get calls and emails from anglers who have had their early enthusiasm truncated by stubborn fish. Blank days without a touch and not a fish to been seen are not uncommon at this time of year, especially for those just starting out.

This is largely down to two factors. Firstly, the water temperature is still cool and our cold-blooded quarry is more lethargic in cold water.

Secondly, the flies and bugs that the fish feed on are still quite thin on the ground. We are having some hatches of Grannom and Large Dark Olive on the river yet in many cases these are not sufficient to force a rise out of a Trout. In these situations, you need to be able to prospect the river in front of you with nymphs and wet flies and understand where the fish will be.

Fish are still lying low and if they refuse to rise, you must be able to take your fy down to them. Trout will hugging the bottom around the gravel and boulders looking for caddis larvae and shrimp. Prospecting an upstream nymph or Czech nymphing the likely areas has been very successful for me over the last week or two.

The good news is that if you can drift a fly over a fishes nose then they should be hungry enough to make a grab for it. Finding the fish is often more important than the choice of fly at this time of year. Make sure your nymph is getting down to the bottom feeding zone. Use tungsten putty or a split shot if you have to.

That said, you can still have some good days and the fish are feeding. Picking your time to go fishing is important, the warmer hours around the afternoon will often trigger a hatch and a feed.

An old angler I know doesn’t bother to wet a line until he see’s leaves on the tree’s and he won’t be fishing for a good few weeks yet.

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Fly Fishing Podcast – Back To Home Waters

In this episode David discovers some beautiful water close to home. Fly fishing using traditional spiders and nymphs on the river Loxley in Sheffield. The season has just opened and insect life is still sparse so prospecting the stream, looking for the likely lies is the order of the day.

Check out the podcast here

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